Privacy

8 Common HIPAA Violations You Must Avoid

8 Common HIPAA Violations You Must Avoid

Anybody who has worked in the medical field has encountered tricky situations when complying with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act guidelines. HIPAA policies are vast in complexity, and they keep changing thanks to the updated Omnibus Rule, which was issued in 2013. The maximum HIPAA fines have also increased to $50,000 per violation, capping at $1.5 million. This means abiding by the updated policies is more crucial than ever. To protect patients and hospitals alike, nurses, doctors and other medical staff need to ensure that security measures and employees are up-to-date on HIPAA’s changes. And one way to do that is by being aware of the most common HIPAA violations.

What is Visual Privacy and How to Avoid Visual Hacking

What is Visual Privacy and How to Avoid Visual Hacking

Visual privacy is the issue of sensitive information being accessed visually via screens creating a security risk for organizations . Learn More About Visual Hacking
Visual hacking is the active threat of sensitive, confidential or private information being viewed or captured for unauthorized use

HIPAA for Nurses – A Few Dos and Don’ts

HIPAA for Nurses

Hospitals do a good job of educating on HIPAA policies, but there isn’t enough focus on guidelines around HIPAA for nurses. With the focus on privacy and security, we have all heard a lot about security breaches, privacy violations, and what HIPAA requires.

18 Patient Identifiers HIPAA Defines as Off Limits

18 Patient Identifiers HIPAA Defines as Off Limits

Hospitals and healthcare providers every start shaking in their boots when they think of social media and healthcare. They freak out about the possibility of a HIPAA violation. But the fear that is struck in many of their hearts is really unneeded. There are 18 patient identifiers that are off limits when it comes to blogging and things of the like.

Why HIPAA Laws Exist: Careless Disposal of PHI, RX pads, and Medications

While browsing the Goodwill tweeter @Potato_Chip found a box of Journal of American Medical Associations. A sweet find for an MD/PhD student right? Unfortunately, it turned out to be bittersweet though for the healthcare industry and patient advocates everywhere. In that very same box were discarded drugs, prescription pads, and ultra sound records. Many of these records, including ultrasounds, had patient identifiers or protected health information (PHI) intact.

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