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Our Best Nursing Blogs of 2016

In 2016, The Nerdy Nurse aimed at being consistent. We wanted to bring you our very best nursing blogs. We've narrowed our focus to almost exclusively on nursing content... PIN NOW, Read Later

In 2016, The Nerdy Nurse aimed at being consistent. We wanted to bring you our very best nursing blogs. We’ve narrowed our focus to almost exclusively on nursing content and really tried to hone in and write on topics that we knew you would be interested in. Historically we’ve jumped around to topics ranging from parenting, …

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Nurses Eat Their Young – How to Stop Being a Victim of Nurse Bullying

Nurses Eat Their Young

Nurses eat their young. If you’re a nurse and haven’t experienced, you likely know someone who does. When I speak about social media and talk about how my bullying experience lead me to find community and connections with nurses online, I always have nurses who approach me after my talk to confide in me their bullying experiences. This happens without fail. I am thankful to make connections with my audience, but it saddens me that this is often the area that sparks a deeper connection.

5 Survival Tips for the Night Shift Nurse

5 Survival Tips for the Night Shift Nurse

Being the night shift nurse is a grueling job. Though, it is the shift most nurses start on in their career. I have worked as a labor and delivery nurse for the last 10 years, 8 of them on the night shift. I have come up with these 5 tips that helped me get through it with two kids, a husband, and a dog.

The Year in Review – The Top 10 Posts of 2015

Year in Review The Top 10 Posts of 2015

2015 has been an awesome year for The Nerdy Nurse! Traffic has grown by over 200%, and we’ve had some amazing opportunities to highlight interesting and innovative products and tools in the world of nursing and technology.

Interested In Nursing? Now What?

playing nurse

There are several ways to start out on your journey depending upon your academic and financial standing right now. If you’re not sure if you’re ready to jump right into a traditional 4-year Registered Nurse (RN) program you can get an Associates Degree in Nursing (ARN) at a Community College, which takes about 2 years, or start out as a Licensed Practical Nurse (or Licensed Vocational Nurse in California and Texas). LPN programs can run as short as 12 months and make a great place to get your feet wet and possibly work while you go back to school to get a higher degree. To be honest, with the high interest rates of student loans and tough admission standards, starting out by getting your LPN or ARN is a good way to see whether or not you truly want to be a nurse, make a little money while you’re going to school, or even get your job to help subsidize your tuition for further education.

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