nurse manager

Why Get Your Master’s In Nursing? [Infographic]

Did you know that the salary of an RN can stall at a certain point? Nurses who earn an MSN on average see a wage increase of nearly $40 an hour. The visual also addresses additional economic benefits of pursuing an MSN along with projections for the increased need in the profession, job satisfaction and other interesting tidbits.

Five Exciting Careers for MSN Graduates

healthcare nurse doctor at computer desk

As a registered nurse, you may have career aspirations that surpass what your RN or BSN degree has prepared you for. You may be aware that the demand for nursing professionals with advanced skills continues to increase nationwide. The U.S. Department of Labor recently reported that demand for MSN (Master of Science in Nursing) degreed professionals in medically underserved areas is at an all-time high.

What Makes an Ideal Nurse Manager?

What Makes an Ideal Nurse Manager?

Nurse Managers retain, recruit and manage nurses. They are also responsible for creating a work environment that allows nurses to function optimally. Nurse managers have the most challenging and important role in hospitals, according to Patricia Folcarelli, RN, MA, a member of the board for the Institute of Nursing Healthcare Leadership (INHL). Folcarelli states, “They’re acting as the CEO for the [nursing] unit. They take care of all the needs that a typical business would have, including staffing, budget, and the demands of the organization, while at the same time being mindful of the patient’s reactions.” A nurse manager is an incredibly demanding job and only certain nurses will be able to fit the bill. If you are currently pursuing a degree in nursing, you may be wondering how you can take your career to the next level. What makes an ideal nurse manager? It’s a combination of ideal personality characteristics and proper education requirements.

Is Medication Timing More Important Than Good Patient Care?

In my years of bedside care I often had to go outside of the 30 minute window for timed medications for the benefit of the patient. Most of the times these times are arbitrary anyhow. If a medication is ordered once per day it doesn’t really matter what time of day the patient gets it. It should fit within their normal routine not within what the pharmacy schedules it. I never once received any sort of reprimand for my medication timing. I often had to request the scheduled times for medications be changed by the pharmacy, but many times I had to give the medication at a different time and documented the reason why.

The Very Real Dangers of For-Profit Healthcare

My nursing career started in a private for-profit corporate hospital. As nurses on the floor, we were governed by decisions and rules made by distant administrators in the their fairy tale corporate castles. They had little to no interests in our community. They didn’t live there. They didn’t know they unique challenges and cultures that impacted the care we provided and needed the ability to provide. Decisions almost always felt like they were made from the benefit of the company as a whole rather than the patients and the communities that the hospitals serve. The administrative process always felt detached to me with middle management, and even CEO’s often throwing their hands in the air and always having “corporate” as the answer to all the tough questions.

Integrity & Clinical Judgement: You Can’t Buy it at Walmart

You expect a nurse to have integrity and use good clinical judgement, but not every one does. It’s even possible that not everyone can. Judgement is subjective, and even though the it is the goal for any prudent nurse to give the same level of care as another, it just doesn’t always happen that way.

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