hipaa

8 Common HIPAA Violations You Must Avoid

8 Common HIPAA Violations You Must Avoid

Anybody who has worked in the medical field has encountered tricky situations when complying with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act guidelines. HIPAA policies are vast in complexity, and they keep changing thanks to the updated Omnibus Rule, which was issued in 2013. The maximum HIPAA fines have also increased to $50,000 per violation, capping at $1.5 million. This means abiding by the updated policies is more crucial than ever. To protect patients and hospitals alike, nurses, doctors and other medical staff need to ensure that security measures and employees are up-to-date on HIPAA’s changes. And one way to do that is by being aware of the most common HIPAA violations.

What is Visual Privacy and How to Avoid Visual Hacking

What is Visual Privacy and How to Avoid Visual Hacking

Visual privacy is the issue of sensitive information being accessed visually via screens creating a security risk for organizations . Learn More About Visual Hacking
Visual hacking is the active threat of sensitive, confidential or private information being viewed or captured for unauthorized use

HIPAA for Nurses – A Few Dos and Don’ts

HIPAA for Nurses

Hospitals do a good job of educating on HIPAA policies, but there isn’t enough focus on guidelines around HIPAA for nurses. With the focus on privacy and security, we have all heard a lot about security breaches, privacy violations, and what HIPAA requires.

Katie Duke Shows Nurses How to Not Use Social Media

Katie Duke Shows Nurses How to NOT Use Social Media

Social media can do many wonderful things for nurses. Even Katie has used social media to catapult herself as a personal brand and grow a huge following online. But it can also have big, sometimes unforeseen consequences, even for bold nurses who are on reality shows.

This is Why You Need to Join a Nurses Support Group Online

Communication and information are the big concepts in healthcare and ironically, they’re also the big movers of the Internet in general. Think about it – we can keep in contact with friends and family, as well as co-workers, bosses, and even your doctor. Information can be shared – as long as you’re careful about it, and abide by HIPAA guidelines – with anyone you allow access to. This can be great or bothersome for us nurses. Think about it, you want a patient to tell you as much information as they can, however having them think they have something they don’t because WebMD mentioned it in an ad isn’t helpful.

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